Sunday, February 15, 2015




We hear so much, with alleged afterlife experiences and in the mystical deposit of Catholicism, about the "life review" -- whereby everything one has done or said or thought is reviewed in the Truth of the Light, with the gentleness of God's knowing love. Everything counts, especially how we treat and speak of others. (Very important -- what we say and do.)
But what about what we have not done or chosen? What about mazes we have created -- indirect routes back to the Lord? By hasty decisions? By not seeking Him in all we do? Can this sometimes prevent direct entry into Heaven? (Do we not confess at Mass "what we have done and what we have failed to do"?)
We once encountered this "word of knowledge": "Besides what you have done will be shown what you could have done; what you were supposed to do; and the course of your life had you chosen to." Imagine that. Look back on your life and the routes you have taken. It may be worth pondering.
A second, related point: the levels of afterlife.
In one case was the vision of a place that looked like a well-kept large cottage in a beautifully wooded area, a cottage covered by lush vines with large green leaves, kind of like a chapel dedicated to the Blessed Mother; a place perhaps not quite in Heaven (who can tell) but if not, a waiting room, a place for final reflection, an anteroom. More for reflection than suffering.
Might it be a place where among other things we see the routes of our lives -- and the mazes we created (by not seeking Jesus strongly enough)?
This notion of a place at the edge of Heaven -- for those who did not seek Him strongly enough -- was revealed to a French nun in a Church-sanctioned revelation ("Unpublished Manuscript on Purgatory"), who described the levels of Heaven -- the first being the middle and lower parts, then the second. 
"In the second Purgatory are the souls of those who died with venial sins not fully expiated before death, or with mortal sins that have been forgiven but for which they have not made entire satisfaction to the Divine Justice," she revealed. "In this part of Purgatory, there are also different degrees according to the merits of each soul. Thus, the Purgatory of the consecrated souls or of those who have received more abundant graces, is longer and far more painful than that of the ordinary people of the world."
She said the highest part of that region, which is closest to Heaven, was "the Purgatory of desire which is called the Threshold." She added: 
"Very few escape this. To avoid it altogether, one must ardently desire Heaven and the vision of God. That is rare, rarer than people think, because even pious people are afraid of God and have not, therefore, a sufficiently strong desire of going to Heaven. This Purgatory has its very painful martyrdom like the others. The deprivation of our loving Jesus adds to the intense suffering."
There are different levels of Heaven, hell, and purgatory (Saint Paul made this clear, at least for Heaven). Decisions done after prayer take us most directly to the upper levels. In purgatory, is the "threshold" one of them?
If we don't fulfill the plan God designed for us, might this too may be shown to us: not harshly; not like a gavel-pounding judge; but in clarity? Reflect. Ask the Holy Spirit to illumine your life. See anew. Ask for "new eyes."
With death comes new eyes. And ears. And sensations. In Heaven, it is said: colors can be "tasted." Sounds can be "seen." All is at its vibrant peak. All is alive. There is resplendence. Radiance. All sends forth light -- rainbows from one "house" to the next, growing in brightness, with colors that are: deeper, richer, brighter, alive, in their true essence and authenticity; multi-various; call it "color fire," interweaving with sounds -- music as loud and penetrating as a trumpet, but gliding as softly as a violin, and pitched as sweetly as a flute. 
The twittering of birds. A thousand golden bells. 
Everything alive, glowing, sparkling. Trees. Hedgerows. Vines. 
On a vine, both lush fruit and gorgeous flowers. "When I touch the leaves, I can feel the green," is the word. "I can feel their life." His Love. His Light.
Desire that place where God our Father permeates all, with all your heart.
Seek His Presence. 
Yearn for it. 
Yearn for Heaven, this Lent. 
Want nothing more. 
You can get there. As long as you are alive, you have the choice and the chance.

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